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From the start of the American Civil War until the end of the Reconstruction, the United States of America endured a significant social and political revolution. During this time, many constitutional and social developments brought about great change in the country—such as the Emancipation Proclamation and new additions to the civil rights bill; as well as some social developments which include the Black Codes and the Ku Klux Klan. The events between 1860 and 1877 proved to be very influential in building pressure for a revolution.
Prior to 1860, the United States split into opposing sides that wanted power, had different views of slavery. The northern states were also focused more on industrialism and manufacturing while the southern states were primarily and agricultural economy. Slave states and Free states were always competing for more representation in congress. In order to prevent too much conflict, congress decided on numerous compromises such as the Missouri Compromise and the Compromise of 1850 to make the majority of states have better proportional representation.
Although many tensions did subside between the north and south, they were only delaying inevitable political and social revolutions. South Carolina became an unofficial leader of the southern states since they began the secession of southern states. After Lincoln was inaugurated in 1860, seven states ceded from the Union with four more joining soon. The south believed that they had the constitutional right to secede from the United States because of their interests separating. South Carolina feared that the north would gain more power over the south and eventually abolish slavery in the south. Feeling their rights were being suppressed, many southerners felt they had no choice but to secede from the Union (Doc A). The end of the Civil War marked the end of the bloodshed but also the beginning of the reconstruction of the nation. The early 1860’s brought up an important issue that still needed to be addressed: the new banking system and a standard currency. Senator John Sherman, a Republican senator from Ohio, spoke to congress about the banking and currency systems, telling them that he felt that the country was not nationalized enough (Doc B). He believed that America would have better prosperity if the country had its own standard currency and banking systems, which would set them apart from the rest of the world. A united government is stronger when has shared ideals, rather than each state having their own system—this would make the federal government weaker and more susceptible to be overthrown.

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